YorkBlvd’s Guide to an Authentic Cinco de Mayo

Ξ April 21st, 2010 | → 2 Comments | ∇ 90042, Beyond Northeast, Drinks, Food, Highland Park |

So you’ve decided to celebrate a Mexican holiday that most of Mexico doesn’t observe in the American tradition of appropriating foreign holidays as an excuse to drink? (See: St. Patrick’s Day and Oktoberfest).  Before loading up your fridge with Trader Joe’s carne asada (which I love) and your cooler with Coronas (which I don’t), let the gringos at YorkBlvd add a dash of Poblano authenticity to your annual celebration of kicking French ass.  (Just don’t make mention of the subsequent French occupation of Puebla and Mexico City.)

1.  We’ve harped on this before, but Highland Park has its own cornerstone of Poblano cuisine near the corner of Avenue 50 and Monte Vista inside Eibis Restaurant.  The cemitas are good, but the tacos arabes will make for a unique appetizer and a history lesson on 19th Century Mexican immigration.

Taco Arabe

Taco Arabe

2.  Just 15 minutes away (on a weekend), El Mercado de Los Angeles in East L.A. carries more Mexican merchandise than you can shake a cesta at.  Specifically, the second floor boasts two shops that sell a variety of regional moles.  I prefer the mole oaxaceña, but since we’re celebrating the Battle of Puebla, we’ll go with the mole poblano.  The mole is sold as a concentrated paste that goes a long way.  Stir chicken broth in over a medium heat, and pour over chicken for a rich main course.  Again, there is a Mexican history lecture that can accompany this course if you like being the wisenheimer of the party.

Enchiladas with Mole Poblano

Enchiladas with Mole Poblano

3.  Our gift to you is the only English recipe on the internet for the Poblano menjul, a central Mexican version of the Mint Julep:

Place six mint leaves and one tablespoon sugar in an old fashioned glass.  (Instead of sugar, a simple syrup should also work nicely.)  Fill glass with crushed ice.  In a shaker, mix two ounces of Amontillado, two ounces dark rum, a few drops of creme de menthe, and a few drops of Angostura bitters.  Shake thoroughly and pour into glass.

Menjul and Michilada

Menjul and Michilada

 

This Week in Northeast Food

Ξ January 28th, 2010 | → Comments Off | ∇ 90041, 90065, Drinks, Food, Glassell Park |

Jonathan Gold tries Cacao, kinda likes the food, and really likes their Hecho in Eagle Rock shirts.  I wonder where they got the idea to steal that from Mexico from

The LA Times interviews Steven and Jeremy Raub, owners of Eagle Rock Brewery, whose three brews are saturating the Northeast.  I’ll finally be sampling the Revolution XPA tonight.  I should have that review up by Easter.

 

Gwyneth Paltrow Knows Highland Park Exists!

Ξ December 15th, 2009 | → 18 Comments | ∇ 90042, Food, Highland Park, Press |

gwyneth_paltrow_300

Unfortunately she confuses us with Eagle Rock and moves us about 16 miles southeast.  On her lifestyle blog, GOOP.com, the actress reports on the best places to dine in Los Angeles.  Among the usual list of popular restaurants is the Tacos La Estrella on Colorado and Highland View with this added note:

A little off the map in Highland Park (it’s east of East LA) La Estrella offers some of the best al pastor tacos.  Worth a little drive after the trip to the Griffith Park or a Dodger’s Game.

There’s so much wrong here that my sense of indignation is about to cause me to have a conniption.  Is it possible that the editorial staff at GOOP, by which I of course mean Gwyneth, simply copied this erroneous entry in the LA Times’ Guide?  In any event, maybe Mrs. Martin can afford a map with her proceeds from Iron Man 2.  Therefore, on behalf of every neighborhood east of La Brea, I would like to formally invite Gwyneth and Apple to have a taco al pastor in Highland Park.  I’ll even stop at Cinnamon to pick up some vegan tamales for Chris.

 

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